Feed aggregator

  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home1/kuehlebo/public_html/ruimtekolonisatie/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.

Pluto Landing Dreams - New Horizons' Team Releases New Zoom-In Video

SPACE.com - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 09:13
On July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons probe flew by Pluto to give us a historic close-up look at the dwarf planet. Now, the NASA team is 'imagining a landing' on Pluto's icy plains with the help of this 'fly-in' video that takes you very close to the

Pluto Flyby Turns One! New Horizons Mission Celebrates Anniversary

SPACE.com - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 09:00
Astronomers hadn't been able to get a good look at Pluto since its discovery in 1930; even NASA's superpowerful Hubble Space Telescope could only resolve the distant dwarf planet into a blur of pixels. But that all changed on July 14, 2015.

U-F-NO! NASA Shoots Down Speculation Over Space Station Video

SPACE.com - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 07:05
NASA shot down an internet rumor that a live camera on the International Space Station was intentionally turned off after the video feed showed a small, bright object just above Earth.

Carnival of Space #466

Universe Today - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 05:39

The tent is up! This week’s Carnival of Space is hosted by Pamela Hoffman at the Everyday Spacer blog. Click here to read Carnival of Space #466. And if you’re interested in looking back, here’s an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space. If you've got a space-related blog, you should really join the carnival. Just email an entry to carnivalofspace@gmail.com, and the next host will link to it. It will help get awareness out there about your writing, help you meet others in the space community – and community is what blogging is all about. And if you really want to help out, sign up to be a host. Send an email to the above address.

The post Carnival of Space #466 appeared first on Universe Today.

Juno Transmits 1st Orbital Imagery after Swooping Arrival Over Jovian Cloud Tops and Powering Up

Universe Today - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 03:31

NASA’s newly arrived Jovian orbiter Juno has transmitted its first imagery since reaching orbit last week on July 4 after swooping over Jupiter’s cloud tops and powering back up its package of state-of-the-art science instruments for unprecedented research into determining the origin of our solar systems biggest planet. The breathtaking image clearly shows the well known banded cloud tops in Jupiter’s atmosphere as well as the famous Great Red Spot and three of the humongous planet's four largest moons -- Io, Europa and Ganymede. The ‘Galilean’ moons are annotated from left to right in the lead image. Juno’s visible-light camera named JunoCam was turned on six days after Juno fired its main engine to slow down and be captured into orbit around Jupiter - the ‘King of the Planets’ following a nearly five year long interplanetary voyage from Earth. The image was taken when Juno was 2.7 million miles (4.3 million kilometers) distant from Jupiter on July 10, at 10:30 a.m. PDT (1:30 p.m. EDT, 5:30 UTC), and traveling on the outbound leg of its initial 53.5-day capture orbit. Juno came within only about 3000 miles of the cloud tops and passed through Jupiter’s extremely intense and hazardous radiation belts during orbital arrival over the north pole. The newly released JunoCam image is visible proof that Juno survived the do-or-die orbital fireworks on America’s Independence Day that placed the baskeball-court sized probe into orbit around Jupiter - and is in excellent health to carry out its groundbreaking mission to elucidate Jupiter’s ‘Genesis.’ "This scene from JunoCam indicates it survived its first pass through Jupiter's extreme radiation environment without any degradation and is ready to take on Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, in a statement. "We can't wait to see the first view of Jupiter's poles." Within two days of the nerve wracking and fully automated 35-minute-long Jupiter Orbital Insertion (JOI) maneuver, the Juno engineering team begun powering up five of the probes science instruments on July 6. All nonessential instruments and systems had been powered down in the final days of Juno’s approach to Jupiter to ensure the maximum chances for success of the critical JOI engine firing. “We had to turn all our beautiful instruments off to help ensure a successful Jupiter orbit insertion on July 4,” said Bolton. “But next time around we will have our eyes and ears open. You can expect us to release some information about our findings around September 1.” Juno resumed high data rate communications with Earth on July 5, the day after achieving orbit. We can expect to see more JunoCam images taken during this first orbital path around the massive planet. But the first high resolution images are still weeks away and will not be available until late August on the inbound leg when the spacecraft returns and swoops barely above the clouds. "JunoCam will continue to take images as we go around in this first orbit," said Candy Hansen, Juno co-investigator from the Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona, in a statement. "The first high-resolution images of the planet will be taken on August 27 when Juno makes its next close pass to Jupiter." All of JunoCams images will be released to the public. During a 20 month long science mission - entailing 37 orbits lasting 14 days each – the probe will plunge to within about 2,600 miles (4,100 kilometers) of the turbulent cloud tops. It will collect unparalleled new data that will unveil the hidden inner secrets of Jupiter’s origin and evolution as it peers “beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.” The solar powered Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter over its north pole, affording an unprecedented perspective on the Jovian system - “which looks like a mini solar system” - as it flew through the giant planets intense radiation belts in ‘autopilot’ mode. Juno is the first solar powered probe to explore Jupiter or any outer planet. In the final weeks of the approach JunoCam captured dramatic views of Jupiter and all four of the Galilean Moons moons -- Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. At the post JOI briefing on July 5, these were combined into a spectacular JunoCam time-lapse movie releaed by Bolton and NASA. Watch and be mesmerized -“for humanity, our first real glimpse of celestial harmonic motion” says Bolton. https://youtu.be/XpsQimYhNkA Video caption: NASA's Juno spacecraft captured a unique time-lapse movie of the Galilean satellites in motion about Jupiter. The movie begins on June 12th with Juno 10 million miles from Jupiter, and ends on June 29th, 3 million miles distant. The innermost moon is volcanic Io; next in line is the ice-crusted ocean world Europa, followed by massive Ganymede, and finally, heavily cratered Callisto. Galileo observed these moons to change position with respect to Jupiter over the course of a few nights. From this observation he realized that the moons were orbiting mighty Jupiter, a truth that forever changed humanity's understanding of our place in the cosmos. Earth was not the center of the Universe. For the first time in history, we look upon these moons as they orbit Jupiter and share in Galileo’s revelation. This is the motion of nature's harmony. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS The $1.1 Billion Juno was launched on Aug. 5, 2011 from Cape Canaveral, Florida atop the most powerful version of the Atlas V rocket augmented by 5 solid rocket boosters and built by United Launch Alliance (ULA). That same Atlas V 551 version just launched MUOS-5 for the US Navy on June 24. The Juno spacecraft was built by prime contractor Lockheed Martin in Denver. The mission will end in February 2018 with an intentional death dive into the atmosphere to prevent any possibility of a collision with Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons that is a potential abode for life. The last NASA spacecraft to orbit Jupiter was Galileo in 1995. It explored the Jovian system until 2003. From Earth’s perspective, Jupiter was in conjunction with Earth’s Moon shortly after JOI during the first week in July. Personally its thrilling to realize that an emissary from Earth is once again orbiting Jupiter after a 13 year long hiatus as seen in the authors image below - coincidentally taken the same day as JunoCam’s first image from orbit. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Ken Kremer …………. Learn more about Juno at Jupiter, SpaceX CRS-9 rocket launch, ISS, ULA Atlas and Delta rockets, Orbital ATK Cygnus, Boeing, Space Taxis, Mars rovers, Orion, SLS, Antares, NASA missions and more at Ken’s upcoming outreach events: July 15-18: “SpaceX launches to ISS on CRS-9, Juno at Jupiter, ULA Delta 4 Heavy spy satellite, SLS, Orion, Commercial crew, Curiosity explores Mars, Pluto and more,” Kennedy Space Center Quality Inn, Titusville, FL, evenings

The post Juno Transmits 1st Orbital Imagery after Swooping Arrival Over Jovian Cloud Tops and Powering Up appeared first on Universe Today.

Judge delays ruling over release of Trump video

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 01:21

Gonzalo Curiel is taking time to decide whether to release videos of the GOP presidential candidate testifying in a civil lawsuit.


RFK Jr. says cousin was framed for murder

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 22:06

Robert Kennedy Jr. argues that relative Michael Skakel was wrongly convicted of killing Martha Moxley.


Trump, family meeting with VP finalists

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 21:06

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is the latest to receive serious face time with the presumptive GOP nominee and his family.


What is Galileo’s Telescope?

Universe Today - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 21:00

In 1610, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei looked up at the heavens using a telescope of his making. And what he saw would forever revolutionize the field of astronomy, our understanding of the Universe, and our place in it. Centuries later, Galileo's is still held in such high esteem; not only for the groundbreaking research he conducted, but because of his immense ingenuity in developing his own research tools. And at the center of it all is Galileo's famous telescope, which still inspires curiosity centuries later. How exactly did he invent it. How exactly was it an improvement on then-current designs? What exactly did he see with it when he looked up at the night sky? And what has become of it today? Luckily, all of these are questions we are able to answer. Description: Galileo's telescope was the prototype of the modern day refractor telescope. As you can see from this diagram below, which is taken from Galileo's own work - Sidereus Nuncius ("The Starry Messenger") - it was a simple arrangement of lenses that first began with optician's glass fixed to either end of a hollow cylinder. Galileo had no diagrams to work from, and instead relied on his own system of trial and error to achieve the proper placement of the lenses. In Galileo's telescope the objective lens was convex and the eye lens was concave (today's telescopes make use of two convex lenses). Galileo knew that light from an object placed at a distance from a convex lens created an identical image on the opposite side of the lens. He also knew that if he used a concave lens, the object would appear on the same side of the lens where the object was located. If moved at a distance, it appeared larger than the object. It took a lot of work and different arrangements to get the lens the proper sizes and distances apart, but Galileo's telescope remained the most powerful and accurately built for a great many years. History of Galileo's Telescope: Naturally, Galileo's telescope had some historical antecedents. In the late summer of 1608, a new invention was all the rage in Europe - the spyglass. These low power telescopes were likely made by almost all advanced opticians, but the very first was credited to Hans Lippershey of Holland. These primitive telescopes only magnified the view a few times over. Much like our modern times, the manufacturers were quickly trying to corner the market with their invention. But Galileo Galilei's friends convinced his own government to wait - sure that he could improve the design. When Galileo heard of this new optical instrument he set about engineering and making improved versions, with higher magnification. Galileo's telescope was similar to how a pair of opera glasses work - a simple arrangement of glass lenses to magnify objects. His first versions only improved the view to the eighth power, but Galileo's telescope steadily improved. Within a few years, he began grinding his own lenses and changing his arrays. Galileo's telescope was now capable of magnifying normal vision by a factor of 10, but it had a very narrow field of view. However, this limited ability didn't stop Galileo from using his telescope to make some amazing observations of the heavens. And what he saw, and recorded for posterity, was nothing short of game-changing. What Galileo Observed: One fine Fall evening, Galileo pointed his telescope towards the one thing that people thought was perfectly smooth and as polished as a gemstone - the Moon. Imagine his surprise when found that it, in his own words, was "uneven, rough, full of cavities and prominences." Galileo's telescope had its flaws, such as a narrow field of view that could only show about one quarter of the lunar disk without repositioning. Nevertheless, a revolution in astronomy had begun! Months passed, and Galileo's telescope improved. On January 7th, 1610, he turned his new 30 power telescope towards Jupiter, and found three small, bright "stars" near the planet. One was off to the west, the other two were to the east, and all three were in a straight line. The following evening, Galileo once again took a look at Jupiter, and found that all three of the "stars" were now west of the planet - still in a straight line! And there were more discoveries awaiting Galileo's telescope: the appearance of bumps next to the planet Saturn (the edges of Saturn's rings), spots on the Sun's surface (aka. Sunspots), and seeing Venus change from a full disk to a slender crescent. Galileo Galilei published all of these findings in a small book titled Sidereus Nuncius ("The Starry Messenger") in 1610. While Galileo was not the first astronomer to point a telescope towards the heavens, he was the first to do so scientifically and methodically. Not only that, but the comprehensive notes he took on his observations, and the publication of his discoveries, would have a revolutionary impact on astronomy and many other fields of science. Galileo's Telescope Today: Today, over 400 years later, Galileo's Telescope still survives under the constant care of the Istituto e Museo di Storia della Scienza (renamed the Museo Galileo in 2010) in Italy. The Museum holds exhibitions on Galileo's telescope and the observations he made with it. The displays consist of these rare and precious instruments - including the objective lens created by the master and the only two existing telescopes built by Galileo himself. Thanks to Galileo's careful record keeping, craftsmen around the world have recreated Galileo's telescope for museums and replicas are now sold for amateurs and collectors as well. Despite the fact that astronomers now have telescopes of immense power at their disposal, many still prefer to go the DIY route, just like Galileo! Few scientists and astronomers have had the same impact Galileo had. Even fewer are regarded as pioneers in the sciences, or revolutionary thinkers who forever changed humanity's perception of the heavens and their place within it. Little wonder then why his most prized instrument is kept so well preserved, and is still the subject of study over four centuries later. We have written many interesting articles on Galileo here at Universe Today. Here's Astronomy Cast also has an interesting episode on telescope making - Episode 327: Telescope Making, Part I For more information, be sure to check out the Museo Galileo's website.

The post What is Galileo’s Telescope? appeared first on Universe Today.

The Moon Is A Real Attention Junkie

Universe Today - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 20:40

We're accustomed to seeing stunning images of both the Moon and Earth floating in space. It's the age we live in. But seeing them together is rare. Now, NASA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) has captured images of the Moon passing between itself and the Earth, in effect photo-bombing Earth. The image was captured with the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera on DISCOVR, and is the second time this has been captured. EPIC is a 4 megapixel camera on board DSCOVR, and DSCOVR is in orbit about 160 million km (100 million miles) from Earth, between the Earth and the Sun. "For the second time in the life of DSCOVR, the moon moved between the spacecraft and Earth,” said Adam Szabo, DSCOVR project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7pZAuHwz0E&feature=youtu.be[/embed] Cool pictures of the Moon are a bonus, though, as DSCOVR's primary mission is to monitor the solar wind in real time for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It does so while inhabiting the first LaGrange point between the Earth and the Sun, where the gravitational pull of the Sun and the Earth balance each other. To do so requires a complex orbit called a Lissajous orbit, a non-recurring orbit which takes DSCOVR from an ellipse to a circle and back. DSCOVR has other important work to do. From its vantage point, DSCOVR keeps a constantly illuminated view of the surface of the Earth as it rotates. DSCOVR provides observations of cloud height, vegetation, ozone, and aerosols in the atmosphere. This is important scientific data in monitoring and understanding Earth's climate. DSCOVR is a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the U.S. Air Force. As mentioned above, its primary objective is maintaining the nation’s real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities, which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of space weather alerts and forecasts from NOAA. The DSCOVR website also has daily color pictures of the Earth, for all your eye-candy needs. Check it out: http://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov/

The post The Moon Is A Real Attention Junkie appeared first on Universe Today.

Is Trump’s campaign the ultimate ego trip?

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 19:50

The businessman turned candidate once admitted that every one of his deals was partly to satisfy his ego.


Britain has a new prime minister

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 19:39

Theresa May has the tough task of calming the country and global financial markets after the Brexit vote.


Where is Earth in the Milky Way?

Universe Today - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 18:40

For thousand of years, astronomers and astrologers believed that the Earth was at the center of our Universe. This perception was due in part to the fact that Earth-based observations were complicated by the fact that the Earth is embedded in the Solar System. It was only after many centuries of continued observation and calculations that we discovered that the Earth (and all other bodies in the Solar System) actually orbits the Sun. Much the same is true about our Solar System's position within the Milky Way. In truth, we've only been aware of the fact that we are part of a much larger disk of stars that orbits a common center for about a century. And given that we are embedded within it, it has been historically difficult to ascertain our exact position. But thanks to ongoing efforts, astronomers now know where our Sun resides in the galaxy. Size of the Milky Way: For starters, the Milky Way is really, really big! Not only does it measure some 100,000–120,000 light-years in diameter and about 1,000 light-years thick, but up to 400 billion stars are located within it (though some estimates think there are even more). Since one light year is about 9.5 x 1012 km (9.5 trillion km) long, the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy is about 9.5 x 1017 to 11.4 x 1017 km, or 9,500 to 11,400 quadrillion km. https://youtu.be/H8iuu543-4M It became its current size and shape by eating up other galaxies, and is still doing so today. In fact, the Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy is the closest galaxy to the Milky Way because its stars are currently being added to the Milky Way’s disk. And our galaxy has consumed others in its long history, such as the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. And yet, our galaxy is only a middle-weight when compared to other galaxies in the local Universe. Andromeda, the closest major galaxy to our own, is about twice as large as our own. It measures 220,000 light years in diameter, and has an estimated 400-800 billion stars within it. Structure of the Milky Way: If you could travel outside the galaxy and look down on it from above, you’d see that the Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy. For the longest time, the Milky Way was thought to have 4 spiral arms, but newer surveys have determined that it actually seems to just have two spiral arms, called Scutum–Centaurus and Carina–Sagittarius. The spiral arms are formed from density waves that orbit around the Milky Way - i.e. stars and clouds of gas clustered together. As these density waves move through an area, they compress the gas and dust, leading to a period of active star formation for the region. However, the existence of these arms has been determined from observing parts of the Milky Way - as well as other galaxies in our universe. In truth, all the pictures that depict our galaxy are either artist's renditions or pictures of other spiral galaxies, and not the result of direct observation of the whole. Until recently, it was very difficult for scientists to gauge what the Milky Way really looks like, mainly because we’re inside it. It has only been through decades of observation, reconstruction and comparison to other galaxies that they have been to get a clear picture of what the Milky Way looks like from the outside. From ongoing surveys of the night sky with ground-based telescopes, and more recent missions involving space telescopes, astronomers now estimate that there are between 100 and 400 billion stars in the Milky Way. They also think that each star has at least one planet, which means there are likely to be hundreds of billions of planets in the Milky Way - billions of which are believed to be the size and mass of the Earth. As noted, much of the Milky Way's arms is made up of dust and gas. This matter makes up a whopping 10-15% of all the "luminous matter" (i.e. that which is visible) in our galaxy, with the remainder being the stars. Our galaxy is roughly 100,000 light years across, and we can only see about 6,000 light years into the disk in the visible spectrum. Still, when light pollution is not significant, the dusty ring of the Milky Way can be discerned in the night sky. What's more, infrared astronomy and viewing the Universe in other, non-visible wavelengths has allowed astronomers to be able to see more of it. https://youtu.be/pdFWbEwsOmA The Milky Way, like all galaxies, is also surrounded by a vast halo of dark matter, which accounts for some 90% of its mass. Nobody knows precisely what dark matter is, but its mass has been inferred by observations of how fast the galaxy rotates and other general behaviors. More importantly, it is believed that this mass helps keep the galaxy from tearing itself apart as it rotates. The Solar System: The Solar System (and Earth) is located about 25,000 light-years to the galactic center and 25,000 light-years away from the rim. So basically, if you were to think of the Milky Way as a big record, we would be the spot that's roughly halfway between the center and the edge. Astronomers have agreed that the Milky Way probably has two major spiral arms - Perseus arm and the Scutum-Centaurus arm - with several smaller arms and spurs. The Solar System is located in a region in between the two arms called the Orion-Cygnus arm. This arm measures 3,500 light-years across and is 10,000 light-years in length, where it breaks off from the Sagittarius Arm. The fact that the Milky Way divides the night sky into two roughly equal hemispheres indicates that the Solar System lies near the galactic plane. The Milky Way has a relatively low surface brightness due to the gases and dust that fills the galactic disk. That prevents us from seeing the bright galactic center or from observing clearly what is on the other side of it. You might be surprised to learn that it takes the Sun 250 million years to complete one rotation around the Milky Way - this is what is known as a "Galactic Year" or "Cosmic Year". The last time the Solar System was in this position in the Milky Way, there were still dinosaurs on Earth. The next time, who knows? Humanity might be extinct, or it might have evolved into something else entirely. As you can see, the Milky Way alone is a very big place. And discerning our location within it has been no simple task. And as our knowledge of the Universe has expanded, we've come to learn two things. Not only is the Universe much larger than we could have ever imagined, but our place within in continues to shrink! Our Solar System, it seems, is both insignificant in the grand scheme of things, but also extremely precious! We have written many articles about the Milky Way for Universe Today. Here's 10 Interesting Facts about the Milky Way, How Big is the Milky Way?, What is the Closest Galaxy to the Milky Way?, and How Many Stars Are There in the Milky Way? If you'd like more info on the Milky Way, check out Hubblesite's News Releases on Galaxies, and here's NASA's Science Page on Galaxies. We've also recorded an episode of Astronomy Cast all about the Milky Way. Listen here, Episode 99: The Milky Way.

The post Where is Earth in the Milky Way? appeared first on Universe Today.

Little-known senator key to Trump's fate

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 16:38

Utah's first-term lawmaker Mike Lee holds a powerful position in the run-up to the Republican National Convention.


Cameron's last day as U.K. prime minister

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 16:09

His successor, Theresa May, will visit the palace, where the queen will ask her to form a new government.


Cameron's last day as U.K. prime minister

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 15:51

His successor, Theresa May, will visit the palace, where the queen will ask her to form a new government.


Astrophotography: Stacking the Moon

Universe Today - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 12:19

Looking for something different to try in the realm of astrophotography? It's amazing what can be done these days with the help of a little free software. DSLR cameras have gone through several generations now, and it's often worth sitting down and exploring a new camera's program menu just to see what intriguing settings are available. Recently, astrophotographer Trevor Mahlmann brought the fascinating method of image stacking to our attention. Stacking allows you to simply place several sequential frames of an object such as the Moon in one image. Trevor's recent June Full Moon rising was even featured on the prestigious Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) website.  As with much of astrophotography, image stacking allows us to see something unique in nature and the universe that would otherwise be invisible. Trevor describes the technique in detail on his website. Key to the method is the use of an intervalometer, which will simply allow you to shoot a series of programmed shots in succession. Some camera have these built-in, while for others, it requires a separate micro/mini USB tethered device. An intervalometer is also handy for taking automated exposures during meteor showers and time-lapses. The motion of the Earth and the Moon becomes readily apparent in long sequence stacks. “Your framing will also depend on what kind of Moon stack you are shooting, moonrise or moonset. At different points during the year, the Moon will rise, pass and set in different locations along the horizon.” Says Trevor. The free program StarStaX is also crucial to the process. Another nifty App that Trevor turned us on to in the course of research is the Photographer's Ephemeris. This shows the rising and setting azimuth for the Sun and Moon for a given location, overlaid on Google Maps. This is extremely handy if you are, say, trying to capture a moonrise shot with a recognizable landmark in the frame. We could have used this for plotting our capture of the partially eclipsed Sun behind the NASA Vehicle Assembly Building back in 2013. Trevor Mahlmann says on his image stacking tutorial: “The whole capture will take about 30 minutes to an hour, possibly longer if you use a shorter focal length, like 50mm or 35mm (cropped). You might check your local hourly weather forecast and take a peak at what might be coming, as it might be dark and you won't see approaching clouds, showers or storms.” As the lunar cycle progresses, Trevor notes that “Your shutter speed and ISO values... will go down as the lunar month progresses towards Full Moon, and go back up as the month progresses towards New Moon again.” The image stacking concept can be extended beyond the Moon as well. How about stacking successive frames of planetary images, especially during an occultation by the Moon? Or stacking successive filtered images of the Sun as it moves through the sky? Stacking is also handy on satellite shots, such as during iridium flares and passes of the International Space Station, especially at twilight and times of high contrast, when a shot demands short exposures. What do you see in these stacked frames? Beyond just pretty pictures, stacking teases out some real effects that would otherwise remain unnoticed. One is the apparent motion of the Moon, due mostly to the rotation of the Earth. The Moon covers its own Full diameter (30' or half a degree) about once every two minutes, and moves one degree eastward due to its own motion around the Earth every two hours. Color change is also apparent, as the Moon rises out of the thick murk of the atmosphere close to the horizon. This effect is also apparent and striking during stacked sequences taken during total lunar eclipses. Another interesting project would be to compare image stacks of the rising Moon near perigee versus apogee. The next favorable occultation of a planet by the Moon for North America under dark skies is Mars on February 18th, 2020. And you'll have a chance to try out this technique during next week's Full Buck Moon coming right up on Tuesday, July 19th. We also asked Trevor what's next and what his thoughts are on pushing this technique a bit further. “I am thinking of trying an all-sky moonrise to moonset photo, not sure how I would do it with the changing moon brightness, but am pondering ideas on how I would do it. I think I could get about 80% of one since even on a Full Moon, the Sun and Moon rise opposite each other and I would want to try and get color of moonrise/set on both sides. I would also need a perfectly clear night from sunset to sunrise.” The Moon's no longer the limit when it comes to astrophotography and image stacking. Check out Trevor Mahlmann's astrophotography blog.

The post Astrophotography: Stacking the Moon appeared first on Universe Today.

Ryan forced to defend support for Trump

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 05:29

House Speaker Paul Ryan emphatically attempted to justify his support for Donald Trump.


Indiana governor auditions to be Trump's VP

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 04:00

The staunchly conservative Mike Pence, a former GOP congressman, is said to be on the shortlist for the job.


'Credible threat' to Baton Rouge police

Yahoo! Space & Astronomy News - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 03:35

Three suspects are accused of stealing handguns as part of an alleged plot to harm officers.


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